New design accolades


Award-winning Cambridge Consultants recognised again for design excellence

Product design and development firm Cambridge Consultants has announced the latest in a string of prestigious awards for design excellence. It has won two iF Design Awards – an internationally recognised label for excellent design. The awards attract more than 5,000 entries from 70 countries every year.

The winning projects were the Chimaera surgical navigation system and the AudioPack smart medical packaging concept. The iF accolades come just months after Cambridge Consultants won a Red Dot Design Award for the second year running – and was named one of the top design studios in the world.

“We are delighted with this latest tribute to the world-leading skills of our designers,” said David Robinson, leader of the medical technology design group at Cambridge Consultants. “Our multidisciplinary approach to product development sets us apart and enables us to transform our clients’ businesses with our innovative approach.

“Our designers are constantly challenging the status quo. They work closely with all our engineering disciplines – particularly our human factors engineers – to identify user needs and create products that are both desirable and technically feasible, as well as easy to use.”

The award-winning Chimaera system is designed to transform neurostimulation implant surgery. It enables surgeons to ‘see in the dark’ deep inside the body – safely navigating them to the target nerve. The Chimaera tool senses both its location within the body and critical structures nearby, in real time. The information is sent via Bluetooth to the surgeon’s display screen, where it is combined with preoperative data to give a moving 3D image – with a clear planned route for the surgeon to follow.

AudioPack is a revolutionary approach to improve patient compliance and the experience of embarking on a complex new treatment regime. It augments traditional printed instructions with audio messages that are triggered by touch-sensitive paper packaging. The aim of the ‘talking’ packaging is to help patients overcome their initial fears of starting a new treatment. It can also help cut clinical costs – reducing the time doctors and nurses need to spend instructing patients on their new medications.

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